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Month: December 2017

Love

As we wish each other happy new year and look towards a richly fulfilling 2018, it’s worth asking to what end.

It is clear to those who have read my work that I believe that the foundation of the universe is interaction (physicists might call it fields) and that since my philosophy is called ‘liquid information’ the question is how meaningful interactions can take place in a wholly liquid information environment – this is the very question of my career. I believe it is imperative to view our world as a complex of different types of interactions and connections and to study them to find out how our world and how we fit together and interrelate.

This then leads me to this very beautiful and thoughtful poetic analysis of the movie Interstellar ‘Interstellar’s Hidden Meaning Behind Love and Time’ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t6kqaip7WS4

Love may perhaps be the prime connection conscious creatures can access. Along the way of our evolution we have managed it in most cases for the most obvious relationship; those of kin and we have enlarged our love for those we feel similar to; those who are on ‘our side’, to include cities and nations and even sports teams.

At this point in our evolution however (when we still have AI who will listen to us and we still have not blown up or dried up our planet), it is time to listen to Jesus who said “”A new command I give you: As I have loved you, so you must love one another.”, Muhammad who said “You will not enter paradise until you believe, and you will not believe until you love one another” and the cool dude in the street who simply says; “Peace, Love”.

If we don’t work to make the term ‘altruism’ a quaint relic of a stage in our evolution when love towards all life was the standard, the base, the very core of our being and our society, we will just build larger and more powerful units of love who will rub up against other units of love and that can get very ugly, as our history has shown again and again; such as on e beloved country or one beloved religion against another.

So love each other. Love is fundamental, love is not a transaction, love is a state of your soul, but also, perhaps more importantly, love is a behaviour, an action. Love is not something confined to the holy place or the bedroom, love is here and now and always a part of us, let us not be ashamed or timid, let us nurture love in our lives and in our work.

To honour a man of overflowing love, how can we show real love on the 9th of December? How can we build love into the work we produce? THAT, is a practical research question.

Happy 2018 everyone!

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DKR Scenario 29 Dec,

This is a scenario meant to show a few capabilities when working in a DKR (Dynamic Knowledge Repository) environment. Please don’t read for specific logic, artistic licence has been applied for and granted by the imagination guild of cyberspace.  

Joe, from ‘Augmenting Human Intellect’ ’62, and you sit down at a nice desktop computer with a large, high resolution screen and Joe asks you about how it’s been going organising the 50th Anniversary of the Doug demo and you start mumbling something and it all seems a bit incoherent and he then points out that this is actually a great start for a demo of the 21st Century DKR so he fires up his ‘DKR Chat’ application. 

Before he does anything specific he congratulates you for the early decision not to try to implement a DKR as a single product but as a way to tying together current protocols and practices into a large collaborative workspace, in effect turning the internet into a DKR.  

You decide to start by looking how you decided to incorporate JSON technologies into the project – you can’t remember exactly why or how you planned to use it.  

‘DKR Chat’, he reminds you, is a chat system build on Solid, which stores the dialog of the group’s discussions and evolution. Since everything in the DKR environment is richly meta-tagged, including real-world time-code stamped for video and audio he can choose to see anyone’s comments based any criteria, such as comments which included a URL in the discussion and so on – the chat effectively also becomes a time browser.  

DKR Chat is only one application in the DKR ecosystem, other people have built what they call OHS Chat and he points out he is not entirely happy with their choice of names but it really doesn’t matter, the DKR is not a piece of software, it is an ecosystem of interactions so anyone can build any type of tool to do anything they are capable of imagining and implementing.  

* In the DKR ecosystem, the only limits are the size of your ideas and the degree of your dedication + your ability to make your data interoperable * 

After typing a few keywords searches for ‘JSON’ Joe decides to show off a little and speaks: “Show me all the comments Jack made which were replied to by Stan and was about JSON” and the screen shows the results. It’s a neat trick and then he asks: “Show me all the chats where someone mentions JSON” and you have a screen full of sentences which includes the word JSON. 

Now it’s both hands on deck. Joe clicks and drags the sentences around the screen and chooses to assign colours to some of the different people on the team who spoke more about JSON than the rest. He then uses this to cluster people and other relevant keywords into a beautiful diagram of the discussions.  

You come across JSON-LD and you ask Joe what they is and in half a second he has the wikipedia definition up on the screen and that is somewhat useful and all occurrences of JSON-LD are visually linked to help you see where they were mentioned.  

After a while of moving the information space around you feel you have come to understand better why and how JSON was used so you ask Joe to pack it up and publish a rich PDF for you which you send to Stan.  

Stan has a system for his email which takes all PDFs and stores them in his cloud where all meta-data from the rich PDF is extracted and he has set an AI bot to look for a few key interests and alert him, so he is alerted to this email and he chooses to open the rich PDF into his AI Ecosystem app, which is fully DKR compliant and integrated, meaning he gets all the sophisticated views you and Joe created in DKR Chat plus specialist tools for his particular world. Stan runs some other AI routines on the document space, watches the view change and then changes it a bit further and then has another insight, which he adds/annotates onto the space and connects live to Jack’s knowledge garden where Jack sees what he is talking about but changes the perspective completely, looking at the space from the point of view of the concepts, not the people. Jack then he sees some interesting relationships and locks it into the document for Stan who sends it back to you. You then open the document and realise that you were looking at it from an odd perspective and now it all largely makes sense but something doesn’t fit so Jack gives you access to plug into his knowledge garden and when you play around with some connections and relationships you also ‘get it’. 

Now you feel you have a good ‘story’ of how it all came about so you publish to a repository as a ‘document’/documentation, which features powerful archival support and you are secure in the knowledge it will both be stored and also consulted, since all the meta data and all the special views are encoded in the document so the server can perform operations on the document plus millions of others. Anyone can now search directly in the document based on keywords, availability of specific citations or views and so on. 

You then tell the system to transfer an address of the document to Houria who chooses to put on her high-resolution VR Headset and look around the view, making changes of her own. While in the VR space she adds some voice annotations and curates a thread which she forwards to Wendy who receives it on her phone, interactively speaking the journey of what the document has revealed.  

And there we go. Wendy sends it to Les who uses entirely different software to interact with the space and so on. The DKR allows the user to interact with incredible amounts of accessible data in extremely deep ways and to share it widely.  

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DKR Scenario 28 Dec

This is a scenario meant to show a few capabilities when working in a DKR environment. Please don’t read for specific logic, artistic licence has been applied for and granted by the imagination guild of cyberspace.  

Joe, from Augmenting Human Intellect ’62, and you sit down at a  nice desktop computer with a large, high resolution screen and Joe asks you about how it’s been going organising the 50th Anniversary of the Doug demo and you start mumbling something and it all seems a bit incoherent and he then points out that this is actually a great start for a demo of the 21st Century DKR so he fires up his DKR Chat. 

The specific question is how you decided to incorporate JSON technologies into the project – you can’t remember exactly why or how you planned to use it.  

‘DKR Chat’, he reminds you, is a chat system build on Solid, which stores the dialog of the group’s discussions and evolution. Since everything in the DKR environment is richly meta-tagged, including real-world time-code stamped for video and audio he can choose to see anyone’s comments based any criteria, such as comments which included a URL in the discussion and so on.  

DKR Chat is only one application in the DKR ecosystem, other people have built what they call OHS Chat and he points out he is not entirely happy with their choice of names but it really doesn’t matter, the DKR is not a piece of software, it is an ecosystem of interactions so anyone can build any type of tool to do anything they are capable of imagining and implementing.  

* In the DKR ecosystem, the only limits are the size of your ideas and the degree of your dedication + your ability to make your data interoperable * 

After typing a few keywords searches for ‘JSON’ Joe decides to show off a little and speaks: “Show me all the comments Jack made which were replied to by Stan and was about JSON” and the screen shows the results. It’s a neat trick and then he asks: “Show me all the chats where someone mentions JSON” and you have a screen full of sentences which includes the word JSON. 

Now it’s both hands on deck. Joe clicks and drags the sentences around the screen and chooses to assign colours to some of the different people on the team who spoke more about JSON than the rest. He then uses this to cluster people and other relevant keywords into a beautiful diagram of the discussions.  

You come across JSON-LD and you ask Joe what they is and in half a second he has the wikipedia definition up on the screen and that is somewhat useful and all occurrences of JSON-LD are visually linked to help you see where they were mentioned.  

After a while of moving the information space around you feel you have come to understand better why and how JSON was used so you ask Joe to pack it up and publish a rich PDF for you which you send to Stan.  

Stan has a system for his email which takes all PDFs and stores them in his cloud where all meta-data from the rich PDF is extracted and he has set an AI bot to look for a few key interests and alert him, so he is alerted to this email and he chooses to open the rich PDF into his AI Ecosystem app, which is fully DKR compliant and integrated, meaning he gets all the sophisticated views you and Joe created in DKR Chat plus specialist tools for his particular world. Stan runs some other AI routines on the document space, watches the view change and then changes it a bit further and then has another insight, which he adds/annotates onto the space and connects live to Jack’s knowledge garden where Jack sees what he is talking about but changes the perspective completely, looking at the space from the point of view of the concepts, not the people. Jack then he sees some interesting relationships and locks it into the document for Stan who sends it back to you. You then open the document and realise that you were looking at it from an odd perspective and now it all largely makes sense but something doesn’t fit so Jack gives you access to plug into his knowledge garden and when you play around with some connections and relationships you also ‘get it’. 

You then tell the system to transfer it to Houria who chooses to put on her high-resolution VR Headset and look around the view, making changes of her own. While in the VR space she adds some voice annotations and curates a thread which she forwards to Wendy who receives it on her phone, interactively speaking the journey of what the document has revealed.  

And there we go. Wendy sends it to Les who uses entirely different software to interact with the space and so on. The DKR allows the user to interact with incredible amounts of accessible data in extremely deep ways and to share it widely.  

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